PhdGuy

Science News, IT News, University News, Fashion news, Game news

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that has been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Team Blogs
    Team Blogs Find your favorite team blogs here.
  • Archives
    Archives Contains a list of blog posts that were created previously.
  • Login
Recent blog posts

Posted on in University News
Mouse model
By Bjorn Carey Courtesy Dai Lab This illustration shows how carbon nanotubes, once injected into the subject, can be fluoresced using near-infrared light in order to visualize the brain vasculature and track cerebral blood flow. Some of the most damaging brain diseases can be traced to irregular blood delivery in the brain. Now, Stanford chemists have employed lasers and carbon nanotubes to capture an unprecedented look at blood flowing through a living brain. The technique was developed for mice but could one day be applied to humans, potentially providing vital information in the study of stroke and migraines, and perhaps...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
Zev Bryant
By Shara Tonn Muneaki Nakamura / Bryant Lab Protein filaments (green and red) glide on the surface of a microscope coverslip, their motion driven by engineered molecular motors. The motors shift gears when illuminated with blue light, causing the motion to slow down. In every cell in your body, tiny protein motors are toiling away to keep you going. Moving muscles, dividing cells, twisting DNA – they are the workhorses of biology. But there is still uncertainty about how they function. To help biologists in the quest to know more, a team of Stanford bioengineers has designed a suite of...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
By Glen Martin Biomass burning – whether accidental wildfires or deliberate burning of forests to create agricultural lands – has long been known to affect both climate change and public health. But until the release of a new study by Stanford Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor Mark Z. Jacobson, the degree of that contribution had never been comprehensively quantified. Jacobson's research, detailed in a paper published on July 30 in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, is based on a three-dimensional computer model simulation of the impacts of biomass burning. His findings indicate that burning biomass is playing a much...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
recharge ponds
By Terry Nagel Chris Austin A new report by the Water in the West program at Stanford identifies a need for more groundwater recharge in California to replenish aquifers. One approach is the use of recharge ponds such as these in the Coachella Valley. Because groundwater is hidden beneath the earth's surface, for many Californians it's a matter of "out of sight, out of mind." Residents often take it for granted and do not realize that it is a critical resource, providing 40 percent of the state's water supply during normal years and as much as 60 percent during dry...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
bumphead parrotfish
By Rob Jordan Jenny Huang Scientists from Stanford and other institutions have found that bumphead parrotfish, like these ones swimming in the Pacific Ocean, become a threat to living corals only when overfishing reduces the shark population. A new analysis published in ­Conservation Biology challenges a widely accepted theory that protecting threatened species with unique functional roles is synonymous with protecting ecosystems. In fact, the study's subject, the bumphead parrotfish, is a prime example of a threatened species that, in high numbers, can damage its surroundings. Among the nine authors of the study are four members of the Stanford faculty...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
By Bjorn Carey Rivers Ingersoll Lentink Lab High speed video of Anna's hummingbird at Stanford Arizona Cactus Garden. More than 42 million years of natural selection have turned hummingbirds into some of the world's most energetically efficient flyers, particularly when it comes to hovering in place. Humans, however, are gaining ground quickly. A new study led by David Lentink, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford, reveals that the spinning blades of micro-helicopters are about as efficient at hovering as the average hummingbird. The experiment involved spinning hummingbird wings – sourced from a pre-existing museum collection – of 12 different...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
Carla Shatz
By Amy Adams Norbert von der Groeben Photography Carla Shatz, director of Stanford Bio-X, credits the university's leadership and location for much of the program's success. The National Research Council of the National Academies recently released a report with recommendations on how to foster interdisciplinary collaboration in the sciences, looking at Stanford Bio-X as one model for success. Bio-X, which was founded in 1998, bridges the life sciences in the School of Medicine and the Humanities & Sciences with Engineering and physics to create collaborations that have led to new fundamental knowledge about the human body while spawning companies and...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
Professor Yi Cui
By Andrew Myers Steve Castillo Yi Cui, Stanford professor of materials science and engineering, and his team are designing a pure lithium anode for rechargeable batteries. Engineers across the globe have been racing to design smaller, cheaper and more efficient rechargeable batteries to meet the power storage needs of everything from handheld gadgets to electric cars.In a paper published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, researchers at Stanford University report that they have taken a big step toward accomplishing what battery designers have been trying to do for decades – design a pure lithium anode. All batteries have three basic components:...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
doctor measuring patient's blood pressure
By Clifton B. Parker Alexander Raths/Shutterstock Health care is one of the factors that influences the odds that people will die at a particular age. The United States has done worse than other wealthy countries at improving health for working-age adults while it has performed about the same in reducing mortality at ages over 65, according to new Stanford research. "These contrasting trends have made the U.S. a strikingly unequal society in the ages at which people die," said Shripad Tuljapurkar, a biology professor at Stanford's Morrison Institute for Population and Resource Studies and lead author. "International comparisons suggest that...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
Helen Longino
By Barbara Wilcox The Humanities at Stanford Courtesy Helen Longino As part of her work, philosopher of science Helen Longino investigates assumptions made by users of behavioral research. Studies of the origins of human sexuality and aggression are typically in the domain of the sciences, where researchers examine genetic, neurobiological, social and environmental factors. Behavioral research findings draw intense interest from other researchers, policymakers and the general public. But Stanford's Helen E. Longino, the Clarence Irving Lewis Professor of Philosophy, says there's more to the story. Longino, who specializes in the philosophy of science, asserts in her latest book that...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
solar electric system
By Rob Jordan Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment Courtesy of BrightSource Energy A Stanford study outlines how power from facilities such as the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in California's Mojave Desert can be part of the state's renewable energy future. Imagine a smog-free Los Angeles, where electric cars ply silent freeways, solar panels blanket rooftops and power plants run on heat from beneath the earth, from howling winds and from the blazing desert sun. A new Stanford study finds that it is technically and economically feasible to convert California’s all-purpose energy infrastructure to one powered by clean, renewable...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
elephants
By Bjorn Carey Claudia Paulussen/Shutterstock Elephants and other large animals face an increased risk of extinction in what Stanford Biology Professor Rodolfo Dirzo terms "defaunation." The planet's current biodiversity, the product of 3.5 billion years of evolutionary trial and error, is the highest in the history of life. But it may be reaching a tipping point. In a new review of scientific literature and analysis of data published in Science, an international team of scientists cautions that the loss and decline of animals is contributing to what appears to be the early days of the planet's sixth mass biological extinction...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
By Bjorn Carey Video by Kurt Hickman Stanford students build a top-quality bike from the ground up. In the summer of 2001, Ryan Connolly wanted to build a bicycle from scratch. Connolly, a master's student majoring in manufacturing systems engineering, had met a master frame builder in Palo Alto and convinced him to come to the Product Realization Lab (PRL) and share his knowledge. That fall quarter, Connolly learned to design and build a frame and fork. In the winter quarter, he built all of the necessary tools, jigs and fixtures required to build not just a single frame, but...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
By Miles Traer As we all know, water runs downhill, forming channels and branched networks as it flows. It's been that way forever. But, believe it or not, scientists' understanding of these networks hasn't changed much in the last century. Even modern techniques developed and employed since the 1960s cannot easily distinguish between channel networks generated randomly inside a computer and images of channels formed in the real world. But work by Stanford School of Earth Sciences recent PhD recipient Eitan Shelef and George Hilley, an associate professor of geological and environmental sciences, is beginning to shed light on this...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
Miniaturized fuel cells
By Glen Martin Chueh Lab, Stanford Engineering Miniaturized fuel cells are probed with high brilliance X-rays at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Solar power and other sources of renewable energy can help combat global warming but they have a drawback: they don't produce energy as predictably as plants powered by oil, coal or natural gas. Solar panels only produce electricity when the sun is shining, and wind turbines are only productive when the wind is brisk. Ideally, alternative energy sources would be complemented with massive systems to store and dispense power – think batteries on steroids....
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
Temple Grandin on the cover of her book, The Way I See it, and Joy Mench, director of the Center for Animal Welfare.
Monday, July 07, 2014 Temple Grandin on the cover of her book, The Way I See it, and Joy Mench, director of the Center for Animal Welfare. FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. – Temple Grandin, a nationally known designer of livestock handling facilities, and Joy Mench, director of the University of California-Davis Center for Animal Welfare, will be featured speakers during the Center for Food Animal Wellbeing’s fourth annual symposium Aug. 7 on advances and current issues in food animal well-being. The center is a unit of the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture and the University of Arkansas. Grandin,...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
Monday, July 07, 2014 Women are being sought for a research study to evaluate the effects of mild dehydration and heat stress on cognitive and thermoregulatory responses in females of varying body sizes. Seeking: 30 females; 18-35 years old; no chronic illness or injury, not taking any medications altering fluid balance, non-smokers, and those with a regular menstrual cycle (oral contraceptives are allowed). You will receive:  A free bone density scan and report of body composition (i.e. DEXA). You will be entered into a $100 raffle.  This study will involve: Three visits to the Human Performance Laboratory (approximately 10 hours...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
Arkansas Interdisciplinary Sciences Lab seeks eligible participants Thursday, July 03, 2014 FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — The Arkansas Interdisciplinary Sciences (ArKIDS) Laboratory is running a study for adolescents ages 10-17 who experienced a very stressful event. Eligible youth must have a parent or guardian accompany them to the lab. The study involves filling out questionnaires and completing some lab tasks, including remembering and writing about a stressful event in the laboratory. Participation takesapproximately three hours and compensation is $40 for the adolescent. Contacts: Emily Mischel, 479-575-3523, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Original link...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
Tim Cavell, professor of psychological sciences, University of Arkansas.
Program designed to help schools support students of deployed parents Tuesday, July 01, 2014 Tim Cavell, professor of psychological sciences, University of Arkansas. FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. – The U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences has awarded a four-year grant of $1.3 million to a research team led by University of Arkansas psychology professor Tim Cavell. The researchers will develop and test a system that school districts can use to offer mentoring to students from military families.  Cavell’s team will research strategies for schools and school districts to identify and support students from military families experiencing deployment-related stress. This form...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
Tuesday, July 01, 2014 The department of exercise science at the University of Arkansas is recruiting 30 U of A students ages 18 years and older to participate in a research study. Compensation of $30 will be provided as well as the potential to earn more money based on performance. Participants must sign an informed consent and are subject to medical clearance for exercising in the heat. The study will take place on July 11 and July 25 at the intramural fields with each participant needing to be available for about an hour and a half (late morning or early afternoon) on both days. Participants will exercise (playing...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
Caitlin Stevens, a researcher at the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies at the University of Arkansas, programs a laser scanner inside the burial chamber in the Meidum pyramid. Photo courtesy Atlantic Productions
Time Scanners features the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies Monday, June 30, 2014 Caitlin Stevens, a researcher at the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies at the University of Arkansas, programs a laser scanner inside the burial chamber in the Meidum pyramid. Photo courtesy Atlantic Productions FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — The University of Arkansas will screen the premiere episode of Time Scanners, a new documentary television series on PBS featuring the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies, on Tuesday, July 1, in in Ken and Linda Sue Shollmier Hall, Room 250 in Vol Walker Hall. The screening, which focuses on the...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
Monday, June 30, 2014 The Learning to Learn Project at the University of Arkansas is seeking first grade and third grade students to participate in a fun interactive project designed to understand how children use their memories. The project takes place on the University of Arkansas campus and children receive a $20 gift card for their participation. It’s fun and a great learning opportunity for children. For more information contact Kara Moore at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . Contacts: Kara Moore, Graduate Assistant Psychology 479-575-5805, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Original link...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
Monday, June 30, 2014 The department of food science at the University of Arkansas is recruiting women ages 18-26 years of age to participate in a research study. Compensation of $50 will be provided.   To qualify, you must skip breakfast at least 5 days per week. The study involves eating breakfast for one week and measuring the following: free body composition testing through DXA (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, resting metabolic rate through indirect calorimetry, blood glucose via finger stick, satiety through visual analogue scales, food intake through completing a three-day food records, you may be required to eat a fixed breakfast for seven days Participants...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
Bonifacio Lopez Torres is one of six honors students to earn a project/research grant from the Bumpers College.
Projects span fields ranging from animal science to tourism Thursday, June 26, 2014 Bonifacio Lopez Torres is one of six honors students to earn a project/research grant from the Bumpers College. FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. – Six honors students in the Dale Bumpers College of Agricultural, Food and Life Sciences at the University of Arkansas have been awarded grants from the college’s Undergraduate Creative Projects/Research Grants Program. Christina Crowder of Kiefer, Oklahoma; Olivia Hines of Fort Lauderdale, Florida; Will Pohlman of Prairie Grove; Omega Sanders of Hot Springs; Jill Thomason of Fayetteville; and Bonifacio Lopez Torres of Lonoke have been...
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted on in University News
The industrial engineering department sent an impressive delegation to the Institute of Industrial Engineers' annual conference.
Thursday, June 26, 2014 The industrial engineering department sent an impressive delegation to the Institute of Industrial Engineers' annual conference. This spring, several faculty members and students in the industrial engineering department received awards and honors from the Institute of Industrial Engineers. “Our department has a strong tradition of achievement and service in this organization, and we appreciate the opportunities and recognition we’ve received as a result of that,” said interim department head Ed Pohl. The Institute of Industrial Engineers Honors and Awards banquet was held June 2 during the Industrial and Systems Engineering Research Conference in Montreal,...
Rate this blog entry:
0

 PhdGuy site is designed as a simple site for Science, IT, University, Games related news, blog, articles.

We are still running Beta version and getting 250,000 visits per month.