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Posted on in University News
Southampton research wins award Ref: 14/188 16 October 2014 Study won RCGP 2013 Research Paper of the Year Researchers at the Universities of Southampton, Manchester and Keele are co-authors on a publication which has won the Royal College of GP's (RCGP) 2013 Research Paper of the Year Award.The paper, which was published in the BMJ earlier this year, explored the process that enables patients to self-manage their own illnesses. The paper suggested that there are too many challenges in current priorities of primary care for clinical staff to provide patients with self-management support, leaving patients to find their own ways...
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Posted on in University News
Southampton programme 'sparks' record crowd funding response in India Ref: 14_187 15 October 2014 Spark India Students 2014 A unique international social enterprise project involving students from the University of Southampton has made history in India by becoming the country's fastest campaign to attract 100,000 Rupees via crowd sourced funding. 'Freedom from Shame' - aimed at empowering women in rural India to become village entrepreneurs - is now on course to continue its record-breaking success by raising 200,000 Rupees via crowd sourcing, thanks to the innovative Spark India programme. Spark India took ten Southampton students representing a range of disciplines...
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Posted on in University News
Past climate change and continental ice melt linked to varying CO2 levels Ref: 14_185 15 October 2014 Scientists at the Universities of Southampton and Cardiff have discovered that a globally warm period in Earth’s geological past featured highly variable levels of CO2. Previous studies have found that the Miocene climatic optimum, a period that extends from about 15 to 17 million years ago, was associated with big changes in both temperature and the amount of continental ice on the planet. Now a new study, published in Paleoceanography, has found that these changes in temperature and ice volume were matched by...
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Posted on in University News
How do we live to 100 and enjoy it? Ref: 14/186 13 October 2014 How to get to 100 exhibits The UK wide exhibition launches in Southampton's West Quay shopping centre. What does it take for us to get to 100 years old? What are our chances of living beyond a century? How do our early years, lifestyle, work and where we live affect our lifespan? These are just some of the questions raised in a new exhibition being taken around the UK by population experts at the University of Southampton.The ESRC Centre for Population Change (CPC), based at the...
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Posted on in University News
British company racing to contain Ebola Ref: 14/184 10 October 2014 High-tech British company Primerdesign Ltd, a spin-off company from the University of Southampton, has developed a fast and simple diagnostic test solution specific to the 2014 Ebola outbreak. With the current epidemic of Ebola virus in West Africa, Primerdesign are racing to provide an easy-to-use, affordable solution for screening suspect Ebola patients. “Accurate diagnostics is essential in controlling an outbreak like Ebola. There is an urgent need for rapid testing to screen suspected patients and people travelling in and out of the region,” explains Dr Jim Wicks, Managing Director...
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Posted on in University News
Nanoparticle research could enhance drug delivery through skin Ref: 14_183 09 October 2014 Scientists at the University of Southampton have identified key characteristics that enhance a nanoparticle’s ability to penetrate skin, in a milestone study which could have major implications for the delivery of drugs. Nanoparticles are up to 100,000 times smaller than the thickness of a human hair and drugs delivered using them as a platform, can be more concentrated, targeted and efficient than those delivered through traditional means. Although previous studies have shown that nanoparticles interact with the skin, conditions in these experiments have not been sufficiently controlled...
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Posted on in University News
Results of world's largest Near Death Experiences study published Ref: 14/181 07 October 2014 Recollections in relation to death, so-called out-of-body experiences (OBEs) or near-death experiences (NDEs), are an often spoken about phenomenon which have frequently been considered hallucinatory or illusory in nature; however, objective studies on these experiences are limited. In 2008, a large-scale study involving 2060 patients from 15 hospitals in the United Kingdom, United States and Austria was launched. The AWARE (AWAreness during REsuscitation) study, sponsored by the University of Southampton in the UK, examined the broad range of mental experiences in relation to death. Researchers also...
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Posted on in University News
A milestone in brain tumour research Ref: 14/179 07 October 2014 The University of Southampton announces a new tissue banking initiative, called the Brain Tumour Archive Network that will unlock thousands of previously hard to access brain tumour samples for researchers throughout the UK. Creation of the network was led by brainstrust and supported by a wider group of brain tumour charities including Charlie’s Challenge, Brain Tumour Research and umbrella group Sophie’s Wish. BRAIN UK, operating at the University of Southampton, will link existing archives of brain tumour tissue in a virtual network so that researchers can gain access to...
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Posted on in University News
Southampton MOOCs reach 100,000 enrolments Ref: 14_182 06 October 2014 The University of Southampton has reached a milestone of 100,000 enrolments on its Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCS. Since launching its first MOOC on web science in November last year, the University has pioneered free interactive courses on oceanography, archaeology and research skills for A Level students. The enrolment milestone was reached as learners signed up for new courses in maritime archaeology, digital marketing and language learning, starting on the 6 October, 13 October and 17 November respectively. The University now has seven MOOCs running in total, many of...
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Posted on in University News
Stem cell discovery could lead to better treatments for blindness Ref: 14/176 02 October 2014 Discovery could lead to new treatments Scientists at the University of Southampton have discovered that a region on the front surface of the eye harbours special stem cells that could treat blinding eye conditions. This part of the eye is called the ‘corneal limbus’ and is a narrow gap lying between the transparent cornea and white sclera. The research, published in PLOS ONE, showed that stem cells can be cultured from the corneal limbus in vitro. Under the correct culture conditions, these cells could be...
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Posted on in University News
Third of countries struggling to meet the needs of ageing population Ref: 14_168 01 October 2014 Photo credit: Marius Arnesen People around the world are living longer, but social policies to support their wellbeing in later life are lagging behind in many countries. This is according a new report by HelpAge International, developed in partnership with the University of Southampton. More than a third of countries are falling significantly behind those at the top of the Global AgeWatch Index. It ranks 96 nations on the basis of the quality of life and social and economic wellbeing of older people (over...
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Posted on in University News
Space debris expert warns of increasing CubeSat collision risk Ref: 14/178 30 September 2014 The increasing number of small ‘CubeSat’ satellites being launched combined with a relaxed attitude to debris mitigation could lead to hazards for all space users unless preventative measures are taken, warns a leading space debris expert from the University of Southampton.Speaking today at the 65th International Astronautical Congress in Toronto, Dr Hugh Lewis said that this combination leads to a growth in space debris, as a result of collisions between CubeSats and other objects in orbit. CubeSats are small satellites (around 10x10x10cm) that are providing opportunities...
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Posted on in University News
Self-made billionaires more likely to give than inheritors Ref: 14/177 29 September 2014 Economics academics have researched motivations behind billionaire donors. A study by economists at the University of Southampton suggests that billionaires who have built their own fortunes are more likely to pledge to donate a large portion of their wealth to charities, than those who are heirs to family fortunes.The researchers examined written testaments of wealthy philanthropists who have signed up to The Giving Pledge, a venture which encourages billionaires to donate at least half of their wealth to charitable causes. It was launched in 2010 by Warren...
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Posted on in University News
Turning the Moon into a cosmic ray detector Ref: 14/175 26 September 2014 Artists rendition of the SKA Scientists from the University of Southampton are to turn the Moon into a giant particle detector to help understand the origin of Ultra-High-Energy (UHE) cosmic rays - the most energetic particles in the Universe.The origin of UHE cosmic rays is one of the great mysteries in astrophysics. Nobody knows where these extremely rare cosmic rays come from or how they get their enormous energies. Physicists detect them on Earth at a rate of less than one particle per square kilometre per century....
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Posted on in University News
Study tracks global sea-levels over the last five ice ages Ref: 14/173 25 September 2014 Land-ice decay caused global sea levels to rise by up to 5.5m Land-ice decay at the end of the last five ice-ages caused global sea-levels to rise at rates of up to 5.5 metres per century, according to a new study.An international team of researchers developed a 500,000-year record of sea-level variability, to provide the first account of how quickly sea-level changed during the last five ice-age cycles.The results, published in the latest issue of Nature Communications, also found that more than 100 smaller events...
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Posted on in University News
Scientists develop tool to help communities stay environmentally and socially ‘healthy’ Ref: 14/174 25 September 2014 Chinese subsistence farming The research by Geographers at Southampton can help poor rural communities Geographers at the University of Southampton have developed a new way to measure the ‘health’ of poor regional communities. They aim to improve the wellbeing of people by guiding sustainable development practices to help avoid social and environmental collapse.The researchers have pioneered a methodology that examines the balance between factors such as; standards of living, natural resources, agriculture, industry and the economy. The results help identify critical limits, beyond which...
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Posted on in University News
Southampton scientists grow a new challenger to graphene Ref: 14/172 23 September 2014 The diameter of the roll is about 10 times smaller than a human hair. A team of researchers from the University of Southampton’s Optoelectronics Research Centre (ORC) has announced a new way to fabricate a potential challenger to graphene.Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms in a honeycomb lattice, is increasingly being used in new electronic and mechanical applications, such as transistors, switches and light sources, thanks to the unprecedented properties it offers: very low electrical resistance, high thermal conductivity and mechanically stretchable yet harder than diamond.Now,...
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Posted on in University News
Nurse survey shows longer working hours impact on quality of care Ref: 14/171 22 September 2014 Longer working hours impact on quality of care New data from the RN4CAST study Results of a survey of more than 30,000 nurses across Europe show that nurses who work longer shifts and more overtime are more likely to rate the standard of care delivered on their ward as poor, give a negative rating of their hospitals safety and omit necessary patient care.Led by researchers at the University of Southampton and the National Nursing Research Unit (NNRU) at King’s College London, the RN4CAST survey...
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Posted on in University News
Mouse model
By Bjorn Carey Courtesy Dai Lab This illustration shows how carbon nanotubes, once injected into the subject, can be fluoresced using near-infrared light in order to visualize the brain vasculature and track cerebral blood flow. Some of the most damaging brain diseases can be traced to irregular blood delivery in the brain. Now, Stanford chemists have employed lasers and carbon nanotubes to capture an unprecedented look at blood flowing through a living brain. The technique was developed for mice but could one day be applied to humans, potentially providing vital information in the study of stroke and migraines, and perhaps...
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Posted on in University News
Zev Bryant
By Shara Tonn Muneaki Nakamura / Bryant Lab Protein filaments (green and red) glide on the surface of a microscope coverslip, their motion driven by engineered molecular motors. The motors shift gears when illuminated with blue light, causing the motion to slow down. In every cell in your body, tiny protein motors are toiling away to keep you going. Moving muscles, dividing cells, twisting DNA – they are the workhorses of biology. But there is still uncertainty about how they function. To help biologists in the quest to know more, a team of Stanford bioengineers has designed a suite of...
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Posted on in University News
By Glen Martin Biomass burning – whether accidental wildfires or deliberate burning of forests to create agricultural lands – has long been known to affect both climate change and public health. But until the release of a new study by Stanford Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor Mark Z. Jacobson, the degree of that contribution had never been comprehensively quantified. Jacobson's research, detailed in a paper published on July 30 in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, is based on a three-dimensional computer model simulation of the impacts of biomass burning. His findings indicate that burning biomass is playing a much...
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Posted on in University News
recharge ponds
By Terry Nagel Chris Austin A new report by the Water in the West program at Stanford identifies a need for more groundwater recharge in California to replenish aquifers. One approach is the use of recharge ponds such as these in the Coachella Valley. Because groundwater is hidden beneath the earth's surface, for many Californians it's a matter of "out of sight, out of mind." Residents often take it for granted and do not realize that it is a critical resource, providing 40 percent of the state's water supply during normal years and as much as 60 percent during dry...
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Posted on in University News
bumphead parrotfish
By Rob Jordan Jenny Huang Scientists from Stanford and other institutions have found that bumphead parrotfish, like these ones swimming in the Pacific Ocean, become a threat to living corals only when overfishing reduces the shark population. A new analysis published in ­Conservation Biology challenges a widely accepted theory that protecting threatened species with unique functional roles is synonymous with protecting ecosystems. In fact, the study's subject, the bumphead parrotfish, is a prime example of a threatened species that, in high numbers, can damage its surroundings. Among the nine authors of the study are four members of the Stanford faculty...
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Posted on in University News
By Bjorn Carey Rivers Ingersoll Lentink Lab High speed video of Anna's hummingbird at Stanford Arizona Cactus Garden. More than 42 million years of natural selection have turned hummingbirds into some of the world's most energetically efficient flyers, particularly when it comes to hovering in place. Humans, however, are gaining ground quickly. A new study led by David Lentink, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford, reveals that the spinning blades of micro-helicopters are about as efficient at hovering as the average hummingbird. The experiment involved spinning hummingbird wings – sourced from a pre-existing museum collection – of 12 different...
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Posted on in University News
Carla Shatz
By Amy Adams Norbert von der Groeben Photography Carla Shatz, director of Stanford Bio-X, credits the university's leadership and location for much of the program's success. The National Research Council of the National Academies recently released a report with recommendations on how to foster interdisciplinary collaboration in the sciences, looking at Stanford Bio-X as one model for success. Bio-X, which was founded in 1998, bridges the life sciences in the School of Medicine and the Humanities & Sciences with Engineering and physics to create collaborations that have led to new fundamental knowledge about the human body while spawning companies and...
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